Ballistic Body Armor Saves Pilot

… by not wearing it?

On June 5th at approximately 1730 hours, a U.S. Customs and Border Patrol helicopter sustained damage from small arms fire while on patrol in a drug interdiction mission on the border of Texas and Mexico. The helicopter took two direct hits from suspects on the ground.

Many helicopter pilots involved with narcotic interdiction work on the Mexican border keep their ballistic body armor beneath their seat instead of wearing it.  In this case, it worked! One round penetrated the cabin of the helicopter and was stopped by the pilot’s vest directly under his seat.

In a short telephone conversation with Border Patrol agent and National Border Patrol Council Local 455 Chapter President Hector Garza, this practice is not uncommon as the biggest threat to pilots’ safety comes from the ground.

U.S. authorities state the shooting took place in an area known as La Bota Ranch, a subdivision of Laredo Texas.  The helicopter and the crew were part of a coordinated effort to interdict a load of narcotics coming from Mexico into Texas.  Local authorities believe that the Mexican drug cartel Los Zetas, might have been involved.  The Los Zetas drug cartel headquarters is located in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, just across the border from Laredo.

At the time of the shooting, U.S. Customs and Border Patrol, the FBI, Homeland Security and the Texas Rangers all responded to the scene.  The suspects fled from the scene and got away.  The crime scene was processed by the Texas Rangers and the FBI. This is an active ongoing investigation being conducted by the FBI.

The IACP/DuPontKevlar®Survivors’Club® recognizes and honors those deserving law enforcement officers, who have survived a life-threatening or life-disabling incident as a result of wearing their body armor.  It is our hope the award presentation will be used to reinforce the importance of wearing body armor daily. We sincerely feel the presentation will also foster a greater relationship between the department’s management and their front line officers.

For more information please go to: http://www.iacp.org/survivorsclub

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

#WhyIWearTheBadge Wednesday – IACP Edition, Jose Mariscal

This post is part of our ongoing #WhyIWearTheBadge Wednesday blog series.

The IACP is fortunate to have several staff members who served their communities and their country as law enforcement officers. While they no longer wear a badge, their dedication and commitment to law enforcement still remains. Today’s post is from Jose Mariscal, IACP Project Manager and former Texas State Trooper.

Mariscal

Jose during his service as a Texas State Trooper.

I joined the law enforcement profession to make a difference in my community by providing a safer environment and helping those that did not have the same opportunities as I did. For me, the idea of being able to make a difference started when I was a kid. At a young age, my parents instilled in me the values of integrity, commitment, and respect. As I got older, I could not see any other profession aside from policing that would allow me to enhance and build on those values.

For over eight years I had the privilege and honor of serving with the Texas Department of Public Safety (TxDPS). TxDPS played a key role in my development not only professionally, but as an individual. As a Trooper, the most enjoyable aspect of the job for me was the men and women I served alongside. Every day I witnessed those same men and women carry out their duties to the best of their ability and strive to uphold the department’s core values of integrity, excellence, accountability, and teamwork.

Jose now serves as IACP Civilian Law Enforcement Military Cooperation Committee staff liaison. Here is he with former CLEMCC member and Hampton, Virginia, Police Chief Terry Sult.

Jose now serves as IACP Civilian Law Enforcement Military Cooperation Committee (CLEMCC) staff liaison. Here he is with former CLEMCC member and Hampton, Virginia, Police Chief Terry Sult.

A big reason I chose to come to IACP is because I knew I would still have the opportunity to interact with men and women similar to those I served with in my department. Since my time at IACP I have been able to assist in providing a key operational component of most law enforcement agencies by facilitating training developed by IACP on two different law enforcement topics. Through the IACP’s Alzheimer’s project I was able to travel across the country and assist in providing law enforcement personnel with training on how to better interact with those affected by Alzheimer’s and other dementias. In my current role as part of the IACP’s Leading By Legacy project, I manage a project that is responsible for providing first line supervisors, command staff, and executive law enforcement officers with some of the best leadership training available.

I am proud to have worn the badge and I am proud to be a part of a great organization like the IACP. By Developing the Leaders of Today and Serving the Leaders of Tomorrow, we can continue to prepare the men and women of law enforcement meet some of the challenges of 21st century policing.

Posted in Law Enforcement Leadership, Projects | Leave a comment

#WhyIWearTheBadge Wednesday – Simple Words, Strong Statements

This post is part of our ongoing #WhyIWearTheBadge Wednesday blog series.

The #WhyIWearTheBadge campaign is still going strong as agencies from around the world share their reasons for wearing the badge and choosing to protect and serve their communities. So far in this series we have heard from individual officers, seen posts from across agencies, and looked at how photos and video can be great mechanisms for sharing these messages.

Sometimes, all it takes is some simple words. Below are just a few examples of how law enforcement has taken to Twitter to share #WhyIWearTheBadge messages in 140 characters or less. They use simple words, but the statements they share are strong and are important for their agencies and their communities.

tweets

Posted in Community Policing, Law Enforcement Leadership, Social Media | Leave a comment

Best Practices and Lessons Learned in Commercial Vehicle Enforcement: A Perspective from the Nevada Department of Public Safety, Highway Patrol’s, Badge on Board Program

Guest blogger: Colonel Dennis Osborn, Nevada Highway Patrol

The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) have come together to focus on developing strategies and deliverables to enhance the Drive to Save Lives/Drive Toward Zero Campaign by incorporating large truck and bus enforcement. The IACP’s Divisions of State and Provincial Police (S&P) and State Association of Chiefs of Police (SACOP) have been working together to develop regional and highway-based enforcement efforts to reduce crashes, develop promising practices, and share lessons learned. Most recently, the IACP’s S&P and SACOP Divisions met to discuss the project and to determine the best ways to support law enforcement’s large truck and bus enforcement mission. Nevada Highway Patrol’s Badge On Board Program is a unique and effective commercial vehicle enforcement (CVE) program that can provide many agencies advice on how to bring awareness to large truck and bus safety. Colonel Dennis Osborn, Nevada Highway Patrol, has provided best practices and lessons learned below for all agencies.

In 2013 more than 4,000, or more than 10%of total, fatalities were the result of approximately 3,800 crashes that involved at least one large truck or bus. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) Data Dashboard (March 2011) reports that in 2010, non-fatal collisions involving passenger vehicles were approximately 47% of all large truck crashes in Nevada that year. In 2008, fatal and non-fatal collisions involving passenger vehicles reached a high of 56 percent of all crashes in Nevada. The Nevada Department of Public Safety, Highway Patrol (NHP) recognizes the role passenger vehicles play in large truck crashes and have utilized a campaign to drive enforcement and public relations on the subject.

badgeonboardThe Badge On Board (BOB) program is designed to improve commercial vehicle safety by focusing on the driving behaviors of passenger vehicles around large commercial trucks. The Nevada Highway Patrol uses both enforcement and public education to improve safe driving behaviors, allowing motorists to share the road safely with commercial motor vehicles.

It is no secret that unsafe driving behaviors can lead to major crashes resulting in the loss of life. A BOB event conducts an enforcement campaign that uniquely targets moving violations of both passenger vehicles and commercial motor vehicles, which occur near large trucks. During a BOB event, a trooper is in the passenger seat of a large commercial truck, which is identified with a graphically designed wrap on the trailer portion containing Badge On Board messaging – transparency with the public is a key part of this program. Once the trooper observes a violation, information is provided to marked patrol units in the vicinity identifying the violation and the violator’s vehicle description. The trooper noting the violation while riding in the truck ensures the correct vehicle has been stopped, in a coordinated effort with patrol troopers. The BOB truck is typically operated by one of the Division’s Commercial Vehicle Safety Inspectors, who has a commercial vehicle driver’s license endorsement.

In 2014, through the assistance of a high priority grant worth just over $400,000, ten Badge On Board enforcement events were held in each of the two major urban areas of Nevada. As the majority of the crashes occur due to unsafe driving behaviors by the passenger car driver, enforcement was centered on the following violations: speeding, unsafe lane change, failure to signal lane change, failure to yield the right of way, following too closely, failure to use due care, and aggressive driving (a combination of two or more behaviors). Just this year, events in Reno resulted in 828 passenger vehicle contacts, 38 CMV contacts, and 980 violations. Over the last five years (2010-2015) Reno has seen 33 events, 2295 passenger vehicle contacts, 108 CMV contacts, and 4005 violations (1029 Speeding, 465 handheld device, 283 following too closely, 233 failure to signal and 228 unsafe lane change). Events in Las Vegas have resulted in 981 passenger vehicle contacts, 1129 violations, and from 2010-2015, there has been a total of 26 events, 4496 passenger vehicle contacts, 168 CMV contacts, and 6151 violations (1799 Speeding, 798 handheld device, 392 following too closely, 345 failure to signal and 299 unsafe lane change).

truckersWhen looking to adopt a similar program keep in mind enforcement events are geared towards increasing public communication and typically conducted in ten-hour shifts over a three-day period. Tractor units and trailers are leased through corporate partnerships and media campaigns are used to build public awareness about truck/passenger safety and the Badge On Board enforcement program. This year, 10 digital billboards have been placed in Las Vegas, 4 digital billboards have been placed in Reno, 6 rural billboards have been placed, 15- and 30-second radio spots played in Las Vegas, Reno, and rural stations, online YouTube video promotion, and Facebook promotion.

Thirty-three thousand lives lost on our roadways is unacceptable. Through high visibility campaigns, media relations, and transparency with public in programs like Badge On Board, that target unsafe driving behaviors, there is no doubt lives will be saved.

If you are interested in starting a similar program, have any questions about commercial motor vehicle enforcement, or want more information on what is going on in the state of Nevada please contact drive2savelives@theiacp.org.

Posted in Best Practices, Highway Safety, Traffic Safety

#WhyIWearTheBadge Wednesday – Tips for Sharing Your Story Through Images

This post is part of our ongoing #WhyIWearTheBadge Wednesday blog series.

ChrisCookGuest blogger: Lieutenant Christopher Cook, Arlington, Texas, Police Department

The Arlington, Texas, Police Department has been posting regular updates across all of our social media platforms to support the #WhyIWearTheBadge campaign. This blog posting will highlight some easy ways to show off the great work through photos that is consistently occurring in your organizations. With the national debate on the legitimacy of policing that is occurring across communities around America, it is now more important than ever to showcase the reason why the majority of us joined this honorable profession.

Let’s face it. All of us have a reason why we raised our hand and swore an oath to protect our community and this great nation. We have to continually earn the right to police our communities every single day and essentially, our badge, along with the great responsibility it symbolizes, are considered “on-loan” to us from our communities. This vast responsibility requires us to be proactive and share the countless stories that highlight our diversity as a profession and demonstrates our unwavering commitment to upholding our oath. By participating with IACP, community trust can be elevated through the personal sharing of stories via social media posts, videos and other testimonials at community events and meetings.

IACP2As the proliferation of social media continues to evolve, it is now easier than ever to support the IACP #WhyIWearTheBadge initiative. Let’s look at one of the simplest ways to get started, which deals with photos. It has been said many times that a photo is worth a thousand words. It has been our experience that a photo can captivate the community thereby increasing the reach of a particular post.

Arlington will take a nice photo of an officer or we will utilize an action shot that someone may have sent us. We then utilize a mobile app to add some simple graphics and text to the photograph. We typically brand the photo also with our badge and patch logo. After the graphic has been created with the photo, we then post it on Twitter and Facebook along with a highlighted story about why the officer joined the profession.

IACP8The community feedback has been amazing. Most of us already know that social media allows law enforcement organizations to humanize their staff through the sharing of photos, videos and stories. The #WhyIWearTheBadge campaign is a natural fit for social media to spread the word quickly while at the same time breaking down barriers that might exist in the community. Here are some of the specific steps we use to create a simple photo graphic that you can replicate. It only takes about two minutes from start to finish.

IACP71. Take a picture of an officer or deputy
2. Save a blue line onto your photo reel on your mobile phone (The line should be transparent PNG)
3. Load the photo into a mobile app called “Union” on the iPhone platform
4. While in the mobile app, place the photo in the “Background” and place the blue line in the “Foreground”
5. Next, export the photo to your camera roll and then load it into a text app that lets you write text within the blue line
6. We use “Phonto” but any text app should work
7. We brand each photo with the hashtag #WhyIWearTheBadge and then export the image back into the camera roll
8. Next, if you so desire, you can use an app called “iWatermark” to add a transparent organization logo
9. Cross promote the photograph and story across all your social media platforms to enhance the overall reach

IACP6It is literally that simple to create a professional looking graphic through a mobile phone. Yes, you can certainly do the same thing with Adobe Photoshop or some other commercial program, however we typically post things quickly directly from our mobile devices in the field. I want to touch real quickly on where the talent and stories come from. No matter how small or large your organization is, there are people that have amazing stories on why they put their badge on every day. Stories could also come from a hero type of event where someone saved another person from a burning building or car crash. The possibilities are only limited by your innovative thinking on how we can do a better job as a profession in promoting our law enforcement personnel in a positive light. We have posted #WhyIWearTheBadge stories on interacting with youth, singing the National Anthem at a ballgame, and pulling kids to safety during traumatic events. All of these types of feel-good stories resonate with our community and position our police department on higher ground.

Our next blog postwill focus on how to create a simple video to support the campaign. In the meantime, don’t hesitate to reach out to us if you need help or you typically use the Android platform. Typically, Android has a similar program that mirrors iOS. We hope to see everyone in Chicago at the annual conference!

Posted in Community Policing, Social Media | 1 Comment

#WhyIWearTheBadge Wednesday – Sharing a Story Through Photographs

This post is part of our ongoing #WhyIWearTheBadge Wednesday blog series.

Guest blogger: Katie Berland, Community Relations Coordinator, Grand Junction, Colorado, Police Department

“What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us. What we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal.” –Albert Pike

The Grand Junction Police Department (GJPD) 2015 Portrait Series, the project began with a simple conversation that turned into something more. Nathan Lopez, the photographer behind the series, wondered: does anyone thank the power lineman after the electricity comes back on after a storm? From there, his decided to show the community that the men and women who serve them do so for a reason. They do it out of the goodness in their hearts.

The Grand Junction Police Department is located in the heart of Western Colorado and is home to gorgeous mountain views and hard working men and women—just like those at the GJPD. The GJPD prides itself on a higher standard of policing and proudly serves the community. These portraits capture the reason why our officers get up in the morning, put on the badge, and walk the thin blue line every day—not because they have to, but because it’s what they are called to do.

Officer Suzette Freidenberger has never known a time in her life that she didn’t want to be a police officer. “Being a police officer is in my blood, my family has been in law enforcement for generations,” said Officer Freidenberger. She considers the GJPD to be her family and proudly wears her badge and protects her community with honor.

Officer Suzette Freidenberger has never known a time in her life that she didn’t want to be a police officer. “Being a police officer is in my blood, my family has been in law enforcement for generations,” said Officer Freidenberger. She considers the GJPD to be her family and proudly wears her badge and protects her community with honor.

“This is what I was meant to do, and this is what I love to do,” said Officer Zac McCullough. Officer McCullough is a three year veteran to the Grand Junction Police Department. For Zac, he believes in leaving a positive impact, shifting preconceived notions and supporting both his work community and the community of Grand Junction.

“This is what I was meant to do, and this is what I love to do,” said Officer Zac McCullough. Officer McCullough is a three-year veteran to the Grand Junction Police Department. For Zac, he believes in leaving a positive impact, shifting preconceived notions, and supporting both his work community and the community of Grand Junction.

Officer Isaac Gallegos remembers where he was on September 11, 2001. That day would change him and shift his ideals. That day gave him a new understanding of “right and wrong” and “good and evil.” “I wanted to do something about it,” said Officer Gallegos. He decided to become a police officer. Isaac believes the children of the community are the future. He proudly advocates and fights for their rights and works to make his community a better place. He said, “Anyone can destroy something, but it is a gift to be able to change a life for the better.”

Officer Isaac Gallegos remembers where he was on September 11, 2001. That day would change him and shift his ideals. That day gave him a new understanding of “right and wrong” and “good and evil.” “I wanted to do something about it,” said Officer Gallegos. He decided to become a police officer. Isaac believes the children of the community are the future. He proudly advocates and fights for their rights and works to make his community a better place. He said, “Anyone can destroy something, but it is a gift to be able to change a life for the better.”

Deputy Chief, Michael Nordine, has known what he wanted to do in life since he was in the 9th grade. A 32-year veteran of the GJPD, he still finds purpose, drive and passion for what he does. Deputy Chief Nordine is an advocate for his community and approaches his line of work as a “people business.” He knows the importance of building relationships on an individual level and puts emphasis on strengthening the community. Deputy Chief Nordine has always known it was his place to serve the public and support those who do the same.

Deputy Chief, Michael Nordine, has known what he wanted to do in life since he was in the 9th grade. A 32-year veteran of the GJPD, he still finds purpose, drive and passion for what he does. Deputy Chief Nordine is an advocate for his community and approaches his line of work as a “people business.” He knows the importance of building relationships on an individual level and puts emphasis on strengthening the community. Deputy Chief Nordine has always known it was his place to serve the public and support those who do the same.

Police Service Technician, Cara Pellowski, has 14 years of law enforcement under her belt—10 of them with the Grand Junction Police Department. PST Pellowski has never been a sworn officer, though she proudly wears her badge in support of the community and her department. Cara is a proud mother, dog owner, and partner to her boyfriend. She has a drive to push herself to grow as a woman and a professional, that drive is the same reason she puts on her badge every morning.

Police Service Technician, Cara Pellowski, has 14 years of law enforcement under her belt—10 of them with the Grand Junction Police Department. PST Pellowski has never been a sworn officer, though she proudly wears her badge in support of the community and her department. Cara is a proud mother, dog owner, and partner to her boyfriend. She has a drive to push herself to grow as a woman and a professional, that drive is the same reason she puts on her badge every morning.

Posted in Community Policing

#WhyIWearTheBadge Wednesday – Sharing Your Agency’s Story Through Video

This post is part of our ongoing #WhyIWearTheBadge Wednesday blog series.

As the #WhyIWearTheBadge campaign continues to spread throughout the world, law enforcement agencies are sharing their stories in many ways. By utilizing text, photos, and videos, agencies are finding diverse ways to connect with their communities and provide a unique look inside their agency. These stories, shared on social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, and even Periscope, tell the true story of law enforcement and speak to each agency’s values and individual officers’ motivations.

One way some agencies are choosing to tell these stories is by using video. Below are just three of the many wonderful #WhyIWearTheBadge videos that have been shared over the last few months.

If you would like to submit a story to be considered for the #WhyIWearTheBadge Wednesday blog series, contact Becky Stickley.

Posted in Community Policing

Warning! Important Notice Regarding Housing for IACP 2015

This is an important notice regarding housing for the 2015 IACP Annual Conference and ExpositiononPeak is the only officially-endorsed housing company for IACP.

We have received reports that other companies are posing as the official travel vendors for IACP 2015. They are NOT affiliated with IACP 2015 in any capacity. IACP only guarantees hotel room rates and availability during the show dates for reservations made through onPeak, the official housing company of IACP 2015.

For your own protection, we ask that you exercise caution when making your hotel and travel arrangements. Unofficial vendors, or “poachers” as they are commonly referred to, cannot provide the same benefits and protection onPeak offers. IACP only guarantees hotel room rates and availability during the show dates for reservations made through onPeak, the official housing company of IACP 2015.

Hotel reservations made outside of the official IACP hotel block can be risky: tradeshows are often targeted by unscrupulous companies who are seeking to take advantage of conference participants. These non-affiliated companies may require that rooms must be fully prepaid; mandate that charges are non-refundable and/or be subject to steep change fees; and room types may not be guaranteed.

In the past, IACP conference participants who have used these unaffiliated companies have encountered situations where vendors were either unlicensed or went out of business after taking reservations and deposits. Individuals were left stranded without hotel rooms or transportation, and resulting in lost deposits.

To avoid situations like this and guarantee your room is booked through the IACP’s official housing company please visit the IACP conference website to view or book available hotel deals through onPeak.

Posted in Annual Conference and Exposition

#WhyIWearTheBadge Wednesday – More Than a Social Media Campaign

This post is part of our on-going #WhyIWearTheBadge Wednesday blog series.

Guest blogger: Michelle Gavin, Community Relations Administrator, Savannah-Chatham, Georgia, Metropolitan Police Department

The #WhyIWearTheBadge social media campaign has been an incredible experience for the Savannah-Chatham Metropolitan Police Department in terms of gaining community support and bolstering the morale of our officers. We began our #WhyIWearTheBadge campaign on Police Memorial Day, and have since been highlighting officers from all of our precincts, investigative divisions and special operations units. Our goal is to profile at least 100 of the more than 500 officers on the force.

When I approach an officer for this campaign, I ask him or her to get to the core of why they became a police officer or why they continue to serve. Some know the answer right away; with others it takes some prodding. It has been a fascinating experience listening to the variety of reasons why our officers wear the badge.

Advanced Police Officer Joel Mondesir

When I asked one of our patrol lieutenants why he wears the badge, he joked and said it was for the pay. Then I asked him a more serious and direct question, why does he consistently step forward and leads his officers in critical incidents. He said, “As a precinct lieutenant I pray for the Lord’s knowledge, strength and blessings to make the right decisions to bring my officers home safely.” When I was ready to the take the photo, the other officers in the squad room were inspired and wanted to take the photo with him.

Lieutenant Greg Ernst

I now have officers seeking me out, asking to participate in the campaign. There is even a bit of competitiveness to see who can get the most likes, shares, and retweets. The officers have asked to keep their #WhyIWearTheBadge statements and have hung them up in their workspaces.

Office Will Fernandez and K9 Faust

I believe with all the negative media attention law enforcement officers have received, the positive comments we are getting from the community on Facebook goes a long way. Many officers say, and our Facebook friends have commented, that they look forward each day to seeing who is profiled next.

Det. Tiffany Manuel

Officer Sharif Lockett

Posted in Community Policing | 1 Comment

A Day in the Life of a Community Policing Unit Sergeant

This blog post is part of a series highlighting best practices in community policing by police departments nationwide as part of IACP’s Community Policing: The Next Generation project. The project showcases modern, innovative, and cost-effective solutions to crime problems and public safety issues through collaboration and partnerships between law enforcement and community stakeholders in order to adapt community policing efforts. The project is funded through the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services.

There is no typical day for Sergeant Nick Ruggiero. As a police officer with a true community oriented policing mindset, he has no set routine. His watch might include anything from surprise barbeques, to graduation ceremonies, to keeping in touch with citizens in the different sectors. He patrols Old Town Alexandria, Virginia, at night; brainstorms new initiatives and programs with his officers; and is cognizant of those wanted on warrants. The one constant in his work is protecting the people he serves, all on an extremely tight budget. He and 10 officers make up the Alexandria, Virginia, Police Department’s Community Oriented Policing Unit.

The Community Oriented Policing Unit takes part in many programs and initiatives to improve their community’s quality of life. The Unit has orchestrated Cops for Christmas, holiday food drives, National Night Out, and graffiti cleanup around the city. The Unit partners with civic associations and has a tight relationship with the Alexandria Redevelopment and Housing Authority that helps place people in affordable housing across the city. The Housing Authority helps the Unit organize and plan events within the affordable housing sectors. It is through these partnerships that the Community Oriented Policing Unit is able to get the funding and assistance needed to make these programs happen.

Officers at a surprise BBQ thrown by the unit. Photo courtesy of Alexandria, Virginia, Police Department

Officers at a surprise BBQ thrown by the unit. Photo courtesy of Alexandria, Virginia, Police Department

Developing and maintaining positive, trusting partnerships is Sgt. Nick Ruggiero main focus. He works with the citizens, not just for them. During his patrol shift, he is often approached by residents updating him on their life and their families. One mother proudly told him about her son’s successful high school graduation, and another women asked for his new cell phone number and email and to keep him updated on programs and goings on in the neighborhood and city. Some of the people he speaks with have either been arrested by him previously, or have met him through some enforcement action, yet these people speak positively and happily to him. In most cases, Sgt. Nick Ruggiero prefers not to arrest and instructs his officers to find alternative means to create safe neighborhoods.

Sgt. Nick Ruggiero was an officer with the Alexandria Police Department for 10 years before applying for an assignment with the Community Oriented Policing Unit. He got into the Unit because he wanted to truly help his community and make a difference.

Operation Lollipop. Photo courtesy of Alexandria, Virginia, Police Department.

Operation Lollipop. Photo courtesy of Alexandria, Virginia, Police Department.

He feels a responsibility to try and change the minds of those who misunderstand or have negative feelings about the police. One of his solutions is to have as many positive non-enforcement interactions with the community as possible. He and his team utilize social media through the Department’s Twitter account and Facebook page to broadcast those positive non-enforcement interactions.

Posted in Community Policing