IACP Committees, Sections, and Divisions – Working For You

If you follow us on Twitter, you’ve likely been seeing a lot of buzz about committee midyear meetings, section conferences, and new resources that are being released during these events. So what exactly are these groups and what do they do?

Committees, sections, and divisions work in the field toward a common goal and help further the IACP’s mission. These groups produce new resources, promote resolutions, and bring subject matter expertise to various projects. Becoming a part of a committee, section, or division is a great way for members to get more involved in IACP and to further their own careers.

20150518_140836

IACP’s Firearms Committee at their midyear meeting at the National Harbor in Maryland.

Committees

Committees are focused on a particular issue in the law enforcement community. Some examples include the Police Investigative Operations Committee, the Civil Rights Committee, the Homeland Security Committee, and the Highway Safety Committee. Committees typically meet twice a year and work toward furthering the IACP’s mission in their particular focus area. Committees also have a set number of members and members serve three year terms.

IACP President Beary speaks at the opening ceremony of the 2015 LEIM Conference.

IACP President, Chief Richard Beary, speaks at the opening ceremony of the 2015 LEIM Conference.

Sections

IACP sections are dedicated to specific disciplines. The Police Physicians Section, Public Information Officers Section, and Smaller Department Section are all examples of IACP sections. These groups bring together individuals from similar fields and with similar interests so that they may work together to solve some of their discipline’s most pressing issues. Some sections hold their own conferences throughout the year and others have educational tracks during the IACP Annual Conference and Expo. IACP members may apply to join a section.

Letteney

SACOP General Chair, Chief John Letteney, looks on during the SACOP meeting at the IACP Annual Conference.

Divisions

In addition to committees and sections, IACP has three divisions: State and Provincial Police (S&P), State Associations of Chiefs of Police (SACOP), and International Policing. These divisions are comprised of individuals from specific segments of the IACP’s membership. The divisions are broken down into geographic regions, which helps facilitate regional information sharing and collaborative problem-solving. Each division holds conferences and meetings throughout the year to provide educational and networking opportunities for members.

Sign up today to be an IACP Member and this will enable you to contribute through IACP’s many committees, sections, and divisions.

This entry was posted in Committees, Divisions, Sections. Bookmark the permalink.